Maquette of Papal Altar

Dimensions:                  31 in. x 31 in.

Medium:                        Wood

Acquisition:                  Archdiocese of Miami Inc. 2008

Collection:                    Pope John Paul II Miami Visit 1987

Exhibitions:                   10/2008 – Current (Permanent Exhibition)

The Maquette of the Papal Altar (Miami, 1987) is a small preliminary scale model design for Pope John Paul’s pastoral visit to Miami. The altar was constructed as planned in Tamiami Park, Miami on September of 1987. 

Miami was the first stop on Pope John Paul II’s six-city visit to the United States on September 10-11, 1987. For a mass to be celebrated by the Pope, a special altar was erected on the Tamiami fairgrounds (adjacent to the campus of Florida International University),  with space allocated for a quarter million worshipers. The grounds have been used for other such purposes as being the site where Cuban refugees were processed during the Mariel boatlift and housing the National Guard when they arrived after Hurricane Andrew in 1992. 

During a whirlwind 48 hours in South Florida September 10-11, 1987, the pontiff met with local clergy members at St. Mary’s Cathedral and with representatives of all U.S. priests at St. Martha’s Church. He also delivered a greeting in Creole to Haitian Catholics, met with President Ronald Reagan and toured an exhibition of Judaica at the Center for Fine Arts (now the Perez Art Museum – PAMM). For a mass to be celebrated by the pope, a special altar was erected on the Tamiami fairgrounds with space allocated for a quarter million worshippers. The temperatures on the day of the mass were searing hot and the service was eventually interrupted by stormy weather. The service was completed in private but the Pope would later re-emerge to bless those who braved the weather. He then departed for his next stop in Columbia, SC. 

Maquette of Papal Altar – (Miami, 1987, 31 inches x 31 inches)
Photographers: Michaelle Vilmont, STU Student – Class of 2022 and Xinying Lin, STU – Graduate Student – Class of 2019

Courtesy of The Archdiocese of Miami

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Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll’s Chalice, Mitre, Missal Cover and Stand

On permanent display are Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll’s Chalice, Mitre and a Missal Cover with stand. Archbishop Carroll was the first appointed bishop and founder of the Archdiocese of Miami.

The Chalice

Date:                               20th Century

Medium:                        Silver Gilt

Dimensions:                 Height 7.8 inches

Classification:              Silver

Acquisition:                  St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, Fort Lauderdale, FL. 2008

Collection:                    Archdiocese of Miami Inc.

Exhibitions:                 10/2008 – Current

The chalice was used during liturgical services by Archbishop Carroll. The sacred vessel used for the consecrated Blood of Christ is made of a precious medal called silver gilt. On the top it has a small bowl with a knop, or knot at mid-point. 

In the Catholic faith, the chalice is the first sacred vessel and must be used according to the existing law of the Church. The chalice, or at least the cup of it, must be made either of gold or of silver and in the latter case, the bowl must be gilt on the inside. In circumstances of great poverty or in time of persecution a calix stanneus (pewter) may be permitted, but the bowl of this also, like the upper surface of the paten, must be gilt. Before the chalice is used during the Eucharist, the chalice must be consecrated. Strictly speaking, only priests and deacons are permitted to touch the chalice or paten, but leave is usually granted to sacristans, and those officially appointed to take charge of the vestments and sacred vessels.

Schulte, A.J. (1908). Consecration. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved April 4, 2019 from New Advent: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04276a.htm

Mitre

Date:                               20th Century

Medium:                        Silver Gilt

Dimensions:                 Height 7.8 inches

Classification:              Silver

Acquisition:                 Saint Mary’s Cathedral, Miami 

Collection:                    Archdiocese of Miami Inc. 

Exhibitions:                 10/2008 – Current

 

Missal Cover

Date:                               circa 1900 – 1960

Medium:                        Gold plated metal

Dimensions:                 Height 8 inches x 10 inches

Classification:              Gold

Acquisition:                  St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, Fort Lauderdale, FL. 2008

Collection:                    Archdiocese of Miami Inc. 

Exhibitions:                 10/2008 – Current

The  exquisitely engraved cover was used to décor the lectionary or missal (Holy Gospel book, a composition of the readings and responsorial psalms assigned for each mass of the liturgical year). Many churches and especially cathedrals use this type of covers and stands. 

The Missal cover and stand are gold plated. The cover has Jesus Christ in the center depicted as Our Teacher surrounded by the four apostles who wrote the gospels  known as the Four Evangelists attributed with the writing of the four Gospel accounts in the New Testament. The Four Evangelists are St. John on the top left, St. Mark on the top right, St. Matthew on the bottom left and St. Luke on the bottom right. The missal and stand surround the figures with floral ornamentations. The same kind of décor is used for the stand.

Missal Stand

Date:                               circa 1900 – 1960

Medium:                        Gold plated metal with Red velvet fabric

Dimensions:                 Height 14 inches x 10 inches

Classification:              Gold

Acquisition:                  St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, Fort Lauderdale, FL. 2008

Collection:                    Archdiocese of Miami Inc. 

Exhibitions:                 10/2008 – Current

 



Archbishop Carroll’s Chalice, Mitre , Missal Cover and Stand
Photographers: Michaelle Vilmont, STU Student – Class of 2022 and Xinying Lin, STU – Graduate Student – Class of 2019

Archbishop Carroll’s Mass Vestment

These Mass vestments were worn by Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll, D.D., the first bishop and subsequently archbishop of Miami from 1958 to 1977. Archbishop Carroll was installed as bishop by the Most Reverend Francis Patrick Keough, D.D., Archbishop of Baltimore at St. Mary’s Cathedral in Miami on October 7th, 1958. The Diocese was elevated to Archdiocese by Pope Paul VI on March 2nd, 1968 and Carroll became its Archbishop.

The stole is a liturgical vestment usually associated with, among others, Catholicism.  It consists of a band of silk colored cloth and the ends either hang straight or they fan out. The stole is worn around the neck with the two ends hanging down in front of the body, parallel to each other. The ends can either be attached to each other or they can simply hang loosely. There is usually some form of religious decoration on the stole, usually a cross and it represents the blood of Christ. The rose color seen here is used on two occasions: the 3rd Sunday of Advent and the 4th Sunday of Lent and it is worn as a sign of anticipated joy.Photo 55

Prie-dieu Papal Cover

Date:                               1987

Medium:                        Linen and wool, embroidered

Dimensions:                 Approx. 48 in. x 36 in.

Classification:             Textiles-Embroidered

Acquisition:                 Archdiocese of Miami

Collection:                    Archdiocese of Miami Inc.

Exhibitions:                 10/2008 – Current

The Holy Father John Paul II on his historic visit to Miami in September of 1987 stayed at the Villa McCarthy with Archbishop McCarthy and Father Navarro.

John Paul II would kneel down to pray on the Prie-dieu (a type of prayer desk primarily intended for private devotional use) which was covered with an embroidered cover made by Karl Duprie especially made for the Pope’s visit.

The embroidering is the Holy Father’s armorial or papal coats of arms  adopted by Pope John Paul in 1978 when he became pope. Below is a beautiful detail photograph of the cover on exhibition at the Archbishop John C. Favalora Archive & Museum.

Photo 54

The Key to the City of Miami

Date:                               1972

Medium:                        Gold-plated in black velvet gold framed box

Dimensions:                 9 1/2 in. x 6 1/2 in.

Classification:             Metal

Acquisition:                 Archdiocese of Miami

Collection:                    Archdiocese of Miami Inc.

Location:                      AJCF Archive

Photo: The Key to the City of Miami presented to Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll on November 19, 1972
Photographers: Michaelle Vilmont, STU Student – Class of 2022 and Xinying Lin, STU – Graduate Student – Class of 2019

On November 19, 1972, the city of Miami awarded Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll the Key to the City of Miami. The same day Archbishop Carroll received a proclamation from the city of Miami, making November 19, the Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll Day in his honor for his tireless dedication to his apostolate to the Miami community and many others. The Key was presented by Mayor David Kennedy.

The key is made of metal and plated in gold. The key’s bow or head measures 2 inches long and it has engraved the word Miami in gothic lettering. The shank, stem or shaft as is often called is 3 inches long. The key’s bit is made of a gothic letter M for Miami and it contains the seal of the city. It reads the City of Miami, Dade County, Florida incorporated 1896.

Chalice – Pope John Paul II’s Papal Mass / Tamiami Park

Date:                               c1980s

Medium:                        Anti-Tarnish finish with gold-plated interior.

Classification:             Silver and Gold Plated

Dimensions:                 Height 6 inches

Acquisition:                 Archdiocese of Miami

Collection:                    Archdiocese of Miami Inc.

Location:                      AJCF Archive

The chalice in the photograph is housed in the archives of the Favalora Museum at St. Thomas University Library. It was used by a priest to administer the Blood of Christ to the faithful during the Papal Mass celebrated in Tamiami Park by The Holy Father Pope John Paul II on September 11th, 1987.

The chalice is a sacred vessel used with the consecrated Blood of Christ. The exterior of the chalice is made of Silver Plated – Bright Star Anti-Tarnish Silver. The base is made of metal with a silver cross. The interior of the chalice is a highly polished 24 kt. gold plated.

Photo: Chalice of Papal Mass / Holy Father Pope John Paul II, September 11, 1987 Archdiocese of Miami, Inc.
Photographers: Michaelle Vilmont, STU Student – Class of 2022 and Xinying Lin, STU – Graduate Student – Class of 2019
Photo: Base Foot (Chalice) of Papal Mass / Holy Father Pope John Paul II, September 11, 1987 Archdiocese of Miami, Inc.
Photographers: Michaelle Vilmont, STU Student – Class of 2022 and Xinying Lin, STU – Graduate Student – Class of 2019
Photo: Chalice Interior of Papal Mass / Holy Father Pope John Paul II, September 11, 1987 Archdiocese of Miami, Inc.
Photographers: Michaelle Vilmont, STU Student – Class of 2022 and Xinying Lin, STU – Graduate Student – Class of 2019

Papal Bull: Establishing Archdiocese of Miami

A papal bull is a public decree from a Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. It is an authenticated document that is seal when issued. Papal bulls have been in use at least since the 6th century, but the phrase was not used until around the end of the 13th century, and then only internally for unofficial administrative purposes. 

In 1958, Pope Pius XII issued a papal bull–a formal document containing a seal or bulla — establishing the Diocese of Miami. Since 1870, Florida Catholics had been part of the Diocese of Saint Augustine. The creation of the new Miami diocese reflected the growing population of Catholics in South Florida. It was comprised of the lower sixteen counties of Florida from Indian River to Monroe on the east coast; from Hardee to Collier on the west coast and every county in between. Coleman F. Carroll was installed as the first bishop of Miami. Just ten years later, in recognition of the rapidly growing Catholic community here, Pope Paul VI established the Archdiocese of Miami comprising Broward, Dade and Monroe Counties. 

Courtesy of the Archdiocese of Miami – Favalora Archive & Museum